Who Is Like You, O Lord


praise God

Who is like You, O LORD, among the gods? Who is like You, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders?  (Exodus 15:11)

This comes from a passage in the Bible that is sometimes called The Song of Moses.  It was sung by Moses and the children of Israel after God opened the Red Sea so the children of Israel could escape from pharaoh’s Egyptian army.

Portions of this chapter from the Bible have been used in many, many contemporary songs sung in churches each week, but have you stopped to ask yourself what prompted Moses to write these words of praise?

Verse 11 describes the unique and great character of the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. There is no God like Him.  He is glorious, holy, awesomely fearful, working miracles that no other can do.  These things would seem sufficient reason to praise the Lord; but there is another aspect we don’t like to think or talk about – but we must because it is Scripture.

Why did Moses compose these wonderful words of praise?

Verse 9.  The enemy said, “I will pursue, I will overtake, I will divide the spoil; My desire shall be satisfied on them. I will draw my sword, my hand shall destroy them.”  These are the words of Egypt’s king.

Then Moses explains in the next verse: You blew with Your wind, the sea covered them; they sank like lead in the mighty waters.

Verse 11.  Who is like You, O LORD, among the gods? Who is like You, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises, doing wonders?

Verses 12-13.  You stretched out Your right hand; the earth swallowed them. You in Your mercy have led forth the people whom You have redeemed; you have guided them in Your strength to Your holy habitation.

Moses praised God at the destruction of the Egyptians and His mercy upon His redeemed ones. This song honoring God’s greatness came at seeing the wicked destroyed for their wickedness.

What is your response when the unbelieving are punished for their sins against God? Do you praise Him or murmur against His ways?

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